Take Care of Your Feet Everyday

Take Care of Your Feet

Check your feet every day for sores, red marks, hot spots, blisters, or any unusual condition that was not there the day before. If you cannot pull your feet up to look at them, use a mirror or have someone else hold it up for you. If you are diabetic, you may not feel a blister or sore until it is too late.

Ulcers are the most harmful problems to your feet. They are the cause of approximately 80,000 amputations of the diabetic feet every year. It is very important to catch an ulcer before it becomes a wound.

If you have an infrared thermometer you can measure the temperature of your feet, by measuring the heat on your feet, you can catch the 4 degree temperature difference before you get an ulcer and know to stay off your feet for a couple of days. No medication or surgery needed.

If you notice any changes on your feet you should call Cortese Foot and Ankle Clinic right away and make an appointment. We are board certified foot and ankle surgeons and specialists. This means we have the qualifications and the experience that you are looking for. We just see foot and ankle injuries. It doesn't matter what age you are, we can treat everyone.

Call if you have any questions or concerns at: (309) 452-3000.

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